Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Duli Xingyi's 獨立性易 Calligraphy at Worcester Art Museum

I have been to Worcester Art Museum before but never noticed they have a piece of calligraphy by the Obaku monk Duli Xingyi (1596-1672). Duli was the contemporary of Yinyuan Longqi 隱元隆琦 but never received Yinyuan's Dharma Transmission. The painting was done by Unkoku Toeki 雲谷等益 (1591-1644).

http://www.worcesterart.org/collection/Japanese/1983.32.html

OBAKU DOKURYU (Calligrapher)
Japanese, 1596-1672
Painting traditionally attributed to Unkoku Toeki, 1591-1644
Daruma
Signature: Shoeki Dokuryu shi Haidai
Seals: (upper) Dokuryu, (lower) Tengai Ichikanjin
Alexander H. Bullock Fund
1983.32

Copyright Notice

This painting of Daruma (Bodhidharma), the Indian monk who traveled from India to China in the sixth century and founded Zen Buddhism, has a traditional attribution to Unkoku Toeki on the basis of interpolated seals. The calligraphy is of greater interest than the portrait, with which it shares a highly simplified style.

Dokuryu (Chinese: Tai Li) was a Chinese scholar and calligrapher who fled the Manchu conquest of his homeland and arrived in Japan in 1653. He took the name Dokuryu when he became a monk under Ingen, the Chinese founder of Mampukuji, the Obaku Zen temple near Kyoto. The Obaku sect was influential in the spread of contemporary Chinese culture in Japan during the Edo period (1600-1868).

Dokuryu's cursive script shares characteristics with his Chinese contemporaries in the late Ming period and has a freedom and rhythm entirely its own, distinct from the calligraphic style of other Obaku Zen monk-calligraphers. The fluid brushwork seen here, with its contrast of wet and dry, light and dark ink, captures the typically irreverent Zen spirit of the inscription, which calls the subject (Daruma) "the old clot."

Monday, December 4, 2017

Jiun Sonja's 慈雲尊者 Calligraphy at Philadelphia Museum of Art


Philadelphia Museum of Art has a piece of calligraphy of Onkō Jiun飲光慈雲 , Japanese, 1718 - 1804, commonly known as Jiun Sonja. It is the title of the Lotus Sutra. See below for detailed cataloging description.


Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law (Myōhō Renge-kyō)

Onkō Jiun飲光慈雲 , Japanese, 1718 - 1804

Geography:
Made in Japan, Asia
Period:
Edo Period (1615-1868)
Date:
Late 18th century
Medium:
Ink on paper; mounted as a hanging scroll
Dimensions:
6 feet 9 inches × 26 1/2 inches (205.7 × 67.3 cm) Image: 48 7/16 × 22 5/8 inches (123 × 57.5 cm)
Curatorial Department:
East Asian Art
Object Location:
Currently not on view

Accession Number:
2002-198-1
Credit Line:

Purchased with the Hollis Family Foundation Fund, 2002
Label:

One the most talented and individualistic of Edo period calligraphers, Jiun was trained as a Buddhist monk and became renowned for his studies of the Sanskrit language. Jiun's calligraphy is most influenced by the brushwork of the Öbaku Zen monks, known as bokuseki (ink traces), although he seems consciously to ignore the rules of calligraphy in his free and idiosyncratic handling of ink and brush. The five-character inscription of this calligraphy reads myöhö renge-kyö, or Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law, referring to the canonical Buddhist text more popularly known simply as the Lotus Sutra.

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Obaku Calligraphy by Hyakusetsu Genyō 百拙元養


Philadelphia Museum of Art has three pieces of calligraphy by the Japanese Obaku monk Hyakusetsu Genyō 百拙元養 (1668 - 1749). Hyakusetsu was Gaoquan Xingdun's 高泉性潡 dharma heir and was famous for painting and calligraphy. The three pieces were titled as "Three Poems" and their cataloging information is as follows:

Three Poems

Hyakusetsu Genyō, Japanese, 1668 - 1749

Geography:
Made in Japan, Asia
Period:
Edo Period (1615-1868)
Date:
Late 17th - early 18th century
Medium:
Ink on paper, mounted as a triptych of hanging scrolls
Dimensions:
Exclusive of mount, each: 37 1/8 × 10 1/4 inches (94.3 × 26 cm)
Curatorial Department:
East Asian Art
Object Location:
Currently not on view

Accession Number:
2008-89-1a--c
Credit Line:
Purchased with funds donated by Andrea M. Baldeck, M.D., and William M. Hollis, Jr., 2008

Label:
One of the early major Obaku monks born in Japan, Hyakusetsu studied poetry, painting and tea ceremony in Kyoto, as well as Rinzai Zen Buddhism. He was well-respected among the aristocratic circles of Kyoto, as a leader in both religious and in cultural circles. He founded a new temple, Hozoji in Western Kyoto in 1733.

Hyakusetsu's calligraphy is characterized by strong contrasts between wet and dry brushwork. This triptych of scrolls is an homage to his spiritual roots in Rinzai Buddhism and his teacher, Hyakuju.






Monday, November 13, 2017

Meet Master Hsing Yun (Xing Yun) 星雲



I was glad to be invited to the 2017 Buddhist University President Forum 佛光山大學校長論壇 and meet Master Hsing Yun (Xing Yun) 星雲 in person. He is a great man and in good health. He came again to see us off when we were about to depart.
https://www.nownews.com/news/20171104/2638017



Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Calligraphy by Ōbaku Dokuryū (Duli Xingyi 獨立性易) at Philadelphia Museum of Art



 I came across a piece of calligraphy by Ōbaku Dokuryū  (Duli Xingyi 獨立性易, 1596 - 1672) at Philadelphia Museum of Art. Duli became Yinyuan's 隱元 disciple but never received his dharma transmission. The collection of his works has been published in Taiwan. The museum gives the following cataloging information.

Calligraphy of a Chinese Poem

Ōbaku Dokuryū, Chinese, 1596 - 1672

Geography:
Made in Japan, Asia
Period:
Edo Period (1615-1868)
Date:
Late 17th century
Medium:
Ink on paper; mounted as a hanging scroll
Dimensions:
Image: 49 x 20 3/4 inches (124.5 x 52.7 cm) Mount: 70 3/4 x 24 5/8 inches (179.7 x 62.5 cm)
Curatorial Department:
East Asian Art
Object Location:
Currently not on view

Accession Number:
2003-29-1
Credit Line:
Bequest of Elizabeth Prior Denis, 2003
Social Tags [?]
poetry [x]


Öbaku Dokuryü was a noted calligrapher and poet in his native China before he emigrated to Japan in 1653 to join the Öbaku Zen temple Mampuki-ji, near Kyoto, Japan. His elegant and flowing calligraphy style strongly influenced his Japanese literati contemporaries.




Friday, November 3, 2017

Chinese-style Chanting of the Heart Sutra by Japanese Obaku monks

When Yinyuan went to Japan in 1654, he also brought the Chinese-style chanting method to Japan which has been preserved in Manpukuji today. We heard the chanting during the summer of 2017. Here is an example of chanting the Heart Sutra in Chinese by Japanese Obaku monks. The Chinese pronunciation can be clearly heard.



日本の般若心経(黄檗宗・唐音)を聴く

Friday, October 20, 2017

A Comprehensive Online Bibliography of Obaku Works 黄檗宗叢書目録

We are grateful to Yōmeiji 永明寺 abbot Ven. Sumitani Ujō's 住谷瓜頂 for making A Comprehensive Online Bibliography of Obaku Works available for us. See 黄檗宗叢書目録 at
http://www.biwa.ne.jp/~m-sumita/BOOK.html